3 Must-Have Deadline Tricks

Here are the 3 Must-Have Deadline Tricks.  I call them Tricks because they help turn dreams into reality. 

These Deadline Tricks work not only for writers but for anyone tackling major projects.

Setting the Deadline is the first procedure that anyone starting a project must determine.

Every project has a deadline.

Very simply, a deadline means “When is this sucker due?”

For indie writers, their novels and stories and blogs could be due . . . whenever.  But “whenever” is NOT thinking like a pro. 

Continue reading “Think like a Pro: 3 Deadline Tricks”

Deadlines is Lesson 1 in Think like a Pro

And deadlines is One Scary Word.

How do we transform ourselves from hobbyist to professional?  How do we change the mindset that our Think like a Pro: New Advent for Writers by [Lee, M.A., Dunn, Emily R.]writing is for escape or entertainment?  If our goal is professional writer, how do we become a disciplined Pro?  The first lesson is Deadlines.

In our long “Winter of Discontent” with our writing, we need to follow the example of the crocus:  emerging from frozen snow to new life.

To help newbie writers achieve that goal, New Advent for Writers: Think like a Pro presents seven lessons as a guide for this transformation.  Like a two-hour seminar, these lessons will seem easy, but the practical application takes focus, persistence, and clear thinking.

Chapter 1 covers deadlines (One Scary Word).

The second chapter presents the importance of daily writing, or as Tolstoy kept on his desk: Nulla dies sine linea (One Latin Phrase).

Chapter 3 examines the models or patterns that every writer depends upon (One Guiding Decision) while Chapter 4 reminds us to learn from those who’ve gone before (One Ancient Greek).

In Chapter 5, entitled One Simple Injunction, the authors preach the great heresy of no excuses.

Chapter 6 (One Slice of Advice) explores how creativity can be sparked.

Chapter 7 discusses determination and resolutions.

Find THINK LIKE A PRO here.

Drinking Elixir with the Gods

Return with the Elixir: last Stage of the Archetypal Story Pattern and the last blog on characters and mythic story structure.  We’re drinking elixir as we toast the last of the novel.

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The gods are drinking elixir and dining on ambrosia. Time for us to join them.

Return with the Elixir, the conclusion of our novel, is certainly not a toss-off that we complete with our writing eyes closed.

As writers, we have slaved to create intriguing characters, unexpected twists in plot, enthralling details with symbols, motifs, and setting and motifs, and captivating elements of word craft on every page.

None of it matters if the last scenes don’t deliver.

It’s a Return = 1st.

The last three stages—the Road Back, the Resurrection, and the Return with the Elixir—belong to the greater ASP segment of Return and Re-Integration.

Our protagonists return to their Ordinary World / Stage 1, their starting point.  They have changed, transforming like an acorn into a mighty oak.

The roots they sent deep into their souls to discover who and what they are have become the honor and ethics that guide them.  Their trunks (their inner strength) are sturdy.  Their limbs reach into the sky.  And they are fulfilled with the potential for more and more and more, each year a new harvest of acorns.

They know how they are different from the antagonist as well as from the rather ordinary people of their OW.

They are no longer ordinary people facing extraordinary events. 

By facing those extraordinary events, they have become extraordinary.

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Perfectly Happy
  • Harry Potter destroys his connection to the Elder Wand, a decision neither Ron nor Hermione understand. No one needs that much power ~ even though Harry has that much power within himself.  (Remember?  Voldemort tried to use the Elder Wand to defeat Harry / Harry defeated Voldemort AND the Elder Wand because of the power within himself.)
  • Aragorn, the returned king, releases the cursed Dead Men of Dunharrow.
  • The Iron Man no longer needs the rush of power from his suits.
  • Elizabeth and Darcy (Pride and Prejudice) no longer depend on the world to determine who they are and what they want.
Our protagonists have succeeded

How do they now re-integrate with the OW that they left behind?

For they must re-integrate.  No one—not even protagonists—can live perpetually in Alt.  The humdrum daily world intrudes.  Life;) happens.

That settling back into the OW helps the reader/audience settle the story in their mind.  Deny them that re-integration, and they will be “unsettled” about the story.

It requires an Elixir = 2nd.

An Elixir is the drink of the gods.  Better than honeyed nectar, the gods’ elixir is magical and miraculous.

The Elixir is tied directly to the Reward which harks back, all the way back, to the original Dear we destroyed at the Call to Adventure (C2A / Stage 2).

The original Dear drove the protagonists into their journey.  That desire transformed and mutated as much as our protagonist did.

At the Reward / Stage 9 the protagonists grasped their new and renewed Dears, a first opportunity to celebrate with the Treasure that sustained their persistence through tribulations and motivated them to continue through the ultimate battle.

Now, the protagonists have the transformed Dear.  The Return of both to the OW is a celebration.

Tangibles and Intangibles

Depending on genre, the Elixir takes various forms, but all contain the duality of literal and figurative.

Protagonists and audiences need a tangibile Elixir, not a symbol or metaphor.
  • The King Crowned
  • The Broken Sword Restored
  • The Ring on her Finger
  • The award or diploma or lectern that represents the Pinnacle Achieved.

The intangible is all that those items represent:
  • The King’s Crown: authority, status, respect.  Wow, I just learned that the Elixir can help improve a character’s motivations all the way back to Stage 1, OW. (This is the reason for planning, rather than pantser-ing.  [Is “pantser-ing” a word?])
  • The Restored Sword: veterans appreciated, wounds healed, rank re-acquired
  • The Betrothal Ring: love and devotion, commitment and truth, health and home.
  • The Pinnacle Achieved: esteem from others, recognition for work and persistence, adulation—which sets up the next book, doesn’t it?  As the protagonist struggles with personal pride and extreme adulation.

Wrapping Up

I hope this year of bi-monthly blogs has enlightened you as much as it has me.

Archetypes seem simple—they are not.  They are not stereotypes, not cookie-cutter models.  They create a framework for our delving into causes and motivations, fears and fortes, and desires and needs for our characters.  These six—causes, motivations, fears, fortes, desires, needs—these create individuals from flat character outlines.

Archetypes build a foundation.  Exploring the character types and the elements of each stage of the ASP build stories with unexpected depths that please our audiences.

And when our audiences are pleased, we are, too.

What’s Next?

Not quite certain.  I’m sure I’ll think of something.  I always do.

Resurrection:  the return from the dead.

Although famous authors have played with the idea of resurrection, our protagonists don’t have to turn into zombies.  Neither do our antagonists.

Resurrection is not new life.  It is the reanimation of the old life, the former problem, the continuing central conflict of the entire story.

Stage 11 of the Archetypal Story Pattern is a dual resurrection.

Before we go into exposition, let’s look at three famous resurrection scenes from the world of film.

“What I tell you three times is true.” ~ “The Hunting of the Snark”, Lewis Carroll

Kill Bill

In Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill, the bride is buried alive.  Grave-deep, encased in a pine wood coffin.  Her enemies believe she is “dead and buried” with no hope of resurrection.

Yet she wakes, assesses her situation, and implements a plan.  She punches through the soft pine then kicks and crawls out of the grave.  Her resurrection shocks an old man.

More shocks await the audience.

Her enemies have turned on each other.  The Black Mamba (Daryl Hannah as Elle Driver) killed the loyal brother Budd, and soon she is destroyed by the Bride (Uma Thurman as Beatrix Kiddo) in a battle that was voted in 2005 as “Best Fight” at the MTV Movie Awards.

We are shocked when the Bride snatches out Elle’s remaining eye—just as Pai Mei snatched out her first one.

3 Lessons from Kill Bill

Lesson 1:  the Resurrection must shock.

Lesson 2:  the Resurrection, whether for the protagonist or the antagonist, must be parallel to another event in the story.  It should not be deliberately foreshadowed;  however, it should mirror the event.  In the audience’s afterthought, the parallelism will become a logical foreshadowing.

Lesson 3:  the Resurrection must present poetic justice.  Elle Driver killed Pai Mei, whom she hated because he snatched out her eye.  Beatrix Kiddo kills Elle Driver, not only in defense but also because Elle killed Pai Mei, whom Beatrix “loved”.

Deathly Hallows

Harry Potter’s Deathly Hallows part 2 gives us a resurrection of the protagonist after J.K. Rowling played throughout the entire series with the resurrection of the antagonistic force.

Because of the philosopher’s stone, Harry does not die.  In his Reward, he is re-united with Dumbledore and discovers victory is not only possible but nigh.  In the Resurrection stage, he returns to his body.  Voldemort is celebrating.  Hagrid is grieving.  Yet we the audience see the beginning tatters of the Death-Eaters’ collapse, as Draco Malfoy’s mother actually lies to Voldemort.

Her lie tells us that Voldemort is not omniscient.  Those who are not omniscient are also not omnipotent.

The mano y mano battle between Harry and Voldemort is intercut with scenes of Hermione and Ron tackling Nagini, the horcrux-holding python.  Hermione and Ron can seemingly do nothing against Nagini.  Harry seems equally matched to Voldemort, neither able to get an advantage over the other.

Enter Neville Longbottom.
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Neville kills Nagini

Two events are juxtaposed.  Neville’s unexpected defeat of the snake precedes Harry’s expected defeat of Voldemort.  Neville is the surprise in this parallel resurrection scene.  Nagini’s death receives our audience’s exultant shout while we merely celebrate Voldemort’s disintegration.  We glory in Harry’s power overwhelming Voldemort, but we are not punching the air in celebration.

3 Lessons from Deathly Hallows

Lesson 1A:  If the protagonist’s battle with the chief antagonist will contain no shock, then another character playing an unexpected role should step forward.

Lesson 2A:  The parallelism of the resurrection scene can be with other characters besides the protagonist or antagonist.

Lesson 3A:  The poetic justice occurs with Voldemort’s defeat and death.  The best part of this scene is his horrified look at the Elder Wand.  Now, at his end, he realizes it does not answer to him as he expected it would.  His richly-deserved death almost seems anti-climatic:  deserved yet subdued, pitiful while we feel no pity, almost beautiful in his dissolution.

Return of the King

Golem’s re-appearance in J.R.R. Tolkien’s culminating resurrection scene for The Return of the King is a necessary surprise.  The surprise occurs because Frodo and Sam left Golem behind.  Golem’s participation in this scene is a necessity because the Ring has finally corrupted Frodo’s intention.

Like Rowling’s Voldemort, Golem is a “dead” creature throughout the series.  He lived off the dead goblins who fell into the abysses of the Mines of Moria.  His old Hobbity self warred constantly with his evil self until the Hobbity self died completely, letting only the evil self alive.

His disappearance seemingly “removed” him from the immediate storyline.  Then he re-appears to fight Frodo in the lava-filled doom of Mount Mordor (just as Bilbo had his own mental battle with Golem in The Hobbit = parallelism!).

Because Golem once possessed his precious, he understands how to find a wearer of the Ring.  No one else in the series has understood this.  Yet, for the audience, it is still a shock when he leaps upon the invisible Frodo.  They fight, a staggering stumble of pummels and buffets on the edge of the rocky spit over the lava river.  The second shock occurs when Golem bites off Frodo’s finger to get the Ring.  He dances to his death.

And with the Ring’s destruction, Sauron’s entity is destroyed.  The trapped Eye of Sauron’s essence frenziedly tries to tear itself away from the destroyed Ring but cannot.

3 Lessons from RotK

Lesson 1B: Golem’s surprising return, his shocking ability to “see” Frodo as well as biting off his finger (mutilation to the hand is somehow more horrible than other grievous bodily harm).

Lesson 2B: Frodo and Bilbo had parallel battles, physical and mental, against Golem.  Bilbo outwits Golem;  Golem “defeats” Frodo.

Lesson 3B:  Golem dances as he falls to his death.  And with the Ring’s destruction, Frodo is returned to his “pure” self;  his innocent intent is resurrected.  Sauron bonded his essence to the Ring.  He believed in the Ring’s indestructibility.  With its destruction, he discovered he break the bond.

Four Compass Points of the Resurrection

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an old compass rose

The Resurrection requires from us writers four important points as we begin wrapping up our story.

Aim North = 1.

The protagonists face their own mortality, whether it is a brief brush or an imminent danger or an actual death.

How the protagonists confront death is the salient point.  Facing death reveals the extreme importance of the protagonists’ desire to achieve the ultimate goal that set them on this journey.

The goal may have changed.  The original desire has not.  The Dear may have changed—and should have.  The desire that fuels the old and new Dear will not have changed.

Contrast the Bride with Frodo. 

She is fully conscious;  he is under the influence of the Ring.  She is driven;  he becomes aimless.  She visits poetic justice twice upon Elle Driver:  the eye snatch and her presumed death from the viper she used to kill Budd.  Frodo receives no ironical justice:  Golem defeats him then falls to his death.  Frodo is ring-less and ring-finger-less.

Our protagonists’ honor and nobility shine through when they face their mortality and still plunge into the last battle.  Death may occur.  They willingly face it.  Why?  Their desired goal is more important than their own self.

Drive Southward to the Doom = 2

The antagonists face their own mortality.

To kill an antagonist who does not realize he is being killed creates a sense of futility.

And the antagonists’ response to impending death is diametrically opposed to the protagonists’ response.  The antagonists fear death.  Voldemort hid parts of his soul in the horcruxes then hid his horcruxes in a bid to live on and on and on.  Unlike the Energizer bunny, however, his life is more in danger because of his piecemeal soul.

Obsession and Fear

Golem’s obsession with his precious Ring is so powerful that he is blind to his own danger and death.  He “died” years and years before.  His obsession with the Ring gave him purpose.  Its loss restored him to the upper world.  The new ringbearer almost—almost!  What a pitiful word!—resurrected his humanity.  Only in Golem’s last blink does he recognize death is on him.  Then we see a brief glimpse of his terror.  In the next blink he disintegrates.

The death and destruction of Sauron’s Eye, however, gives us the essential realization of impending death.  The Eye’s frenzy becomes more powerful than Golem’s blink.

Head to the Expected East = 3

The Resurrection is both destruction and re-creation.

The antagonist is destroyed.  The antagonistic force is defeated.  The evil is stuffed into a coffin.

Writers who want a sequel need to take lessons from Tolkien and Rowling:  each book must have its own antagonist to be defeated while the series’ antagonist must be completely defeated in the final book of the series.

No hiding additional horcruxes.  Give the story up.

Love your protagonists too much to let them live happily ever after?  Start a new series.  Years on, with a completely different antagonist.

Re-creation is as important as destruction

Harry is his own self and more.  He breaks the Elder Wand and tosses it into an abyssal canyon (the film.  In the book, he restores it to Dumbledore’s tomb, still a severed connection).  Harry refuses to wield the great power gifted to him.  He refuses to allow power to corrupt him.  (Thank you, Lord Acton.)

Frodo’s own self is restored—yet wearing the Ring has also broken him.  He must leave with the last elves.

The Bride is now free to seek her daughter, restoring the connection and creating a future with her daughter.  Her battle with Bill is not titanic although it is matchless.  It allows the Elixir which is the last Stage of the Archetypal Story Pattern.

Skew West = 4

As noted in the lessons, the Resurrection must shock the audience.

Not with gore.  Not with a new twist.  A new twist only continues the story longer.

The shock must be something the audience didn’t anticipate yet in hindsight truly appreciates.  No foreshadowing for the shock.  We have to build the elements in such a way that we logically accept their occurrence even as we emotionally celebrate them.

This shock is particularly hard to write since the early-on Stage 2 set up our anticipation of the final battle.

Neville’s chopping off of Nagini’s head is the shock.  Voldemort ripped Neville’s “soul” away when he killed his parents.  Neville has had to rebuild his “soul”.  How fitting that Neville kills the last holder of Voldemort’s piecemeal soul. 

As for the audience, well, we anticipated Voldemort’s defeat.

Careful with Shocks

Knowing the antagonist will be defeated is not where the shock will occur.  Unless our audience is reading one of the so-called “edgy” new series in which the protagonist is killed.

(Killing the protagonist is not edgy, BTW;  it infuriates the audience.  It’s a cheap way to be edgy.  We writers are better than that.  Find another way.  Keep the audience reading to your next series.)

Quentin Tarantino gives us an unexpected relish with the eye-snatch.

Golem’s reappearance surprises.  The SHOCK occurs when he takes both ring and ring finger from Frodo.

And then we nod, at Neville, at the Bride, at Frodo.  Yes, that is symbolic parity.

Wrapping Up

Remember the 3 Lessons and the 4 Compass Points when constructing the ultimate battle scene of destruction and resurrection.  The expected and the unexpected will satisfy the audience.

Not only will they keep reading to the end of the book;  they will also buy the next and the next and the next.

We’re driving the Road Back to our protagonists’ Ordinary World.

As we head into the Road Back of the story we’re writing, how are we doing?

Let’s see:  In the past 80% of story, we’ve

  1. Transformed the protagonists.
  2. Changed their goals into new Dears.
  3. Provided a transformed Dear to the protagonists as Rewards.
  4. Given them worthy allies.
  5. Defeated villains and elements of the antagonistic force.
  6. Overcome fears and evils, exterior and interior.

My goodness, what else must we do?  The hardest thing.  We must truly defeat the antagonist.

And then find our way back home—whatever “home” now represents.

Easy enough.

Well, no.

And not because the antagonist is still out there, a maelstrom of chaotic evil.

Here’s our big question:  How do we find the right Road Back?

Driving with the Old Dear

SPOILERS ALERT:  If you have never seen Castawaygo watch it now.  It will be a pivotal and enriching experience in your life.  I am also warning you that I give away many, many crucial details about the end of the film in the remainder of this blog.  Tom Hanks should have won the Academy Award for Best Actor for this film.  This is his landmark role, not Forrest Gump and not Philadephia and certainly not The Green Mile, all great films but not of the caliber of Castaway.

The official Movie Trailer:

The Dear destroyed at the Call to Adventure is not the Dear of the Reward.  This Dear is transformed, just as the protagonist is transformed.

The transformation is clearly evident in Castaway, the film with Tom Hanks and Helen Hunt.  Hanks’ character Chuck survives deprivation and extreme loneliness only because returning to his lost love (Hunt enacting Kelly) became his goal. 

Yet he transformed:  he learned to be in the moment—instead of always working toward a future deadline.  He learned to appreciate the smallest of miracles and to heed obscure signs.The protagonist Chuck needs someone as his Dear who is also open to these hidden yet highly significant realities. 

Kelly is not that person, and we discover that in the scene where he is reunited with her.

Two Story Stages:  Road Back and Resurrection

In Castaway the Road Back begins with the celebration at the airport then continues through his visit to her house.  That visit to her house also launches into the Resurrection, the stage of story where evil recurs that endangers the protagonist. 

Since the two stages are so closely intertwined in this film, I’ll discuss both.  Just know that the Road Back is their attempts at re-connection while the Resurrection is the acceptance of the need to part.

Chuck Doesn’t Match to Kelly

  • At Kelly’s house, Chuck is in the moment of their reunion.
    • >> Kelly can’t face their reunion. First, she is not able to meet him at the airport.  Then, when he comes to her house, she is continually “doing” as a distraction—showing him a car and a map, fiddling with housework.  She is focused on him but also on all the things between
      • Twice she looks hard at him, as if not able to believe that this man before her is her old love returned to her. He is physically changed.  He is also mentally and spiritually changed, although these changes are not as easily observed.
  • Chuck comments on the miracle of her child.
    • >> Her response is a criticism. Children are miracles, not things to be managed.  They are the blessing of the future with the wonder of the now.  Instead, Kelly dismisses any conversation about her child by saying something like “She’s a mess.”
  • Chuck heeds the signs.
    • >> Kelly is blind to them.  She must blind herself to them or abandon the life she had built without him.  She makes her decision.  Yet when he drives away, she still clings to her past and calls him back.  She kept “their car”, another sign of her clinging to the past.

The Problem with Kelly

Kelly is static, stagnant, bitter with the losses, not transformed by them.  She abandoned her greatest goal without saying goodbye to it.

We admire Kelly.  We want her to reunite with Chuck.  They are each other’s “love of my life”.  But they’re not right for each other.  Maybe they never were, even before Chuck transformed.

We grieve with them as they part.

Driving the Right Road Back 

We don’t grieve at the end of Castaway when Chuck meets the Angel-wings lady.  We want him to connect with her.

See, we know he doesn’t belong with Kelly.  Look at his brief yet revelatory encounter with the Angel-wings lady.

Chuck is “in the moment”.
  • She is “in the moment”.
    • When giving directions, she focuses on him, she makes eye contact, and then she flows forward like water and time.
Chuck is connected to the miraculous.
  • She appreciates blissful moments.
    • Art is itself a blissful miracle, and she chose as her mark the double-haloed angel wings.  Her FedEx package marked with the double-haloed angel-wings is the only package that Chuck does not open.
  • Even with the break-up of her marriage (exhibited by the sign at the ranch’s entrance, with the ex-husband’s name obliterated from it), the Angel-wings lady maintains her connection to the miraculous.
    • Just as Chuck’s survival was a series of miracles, their meeting here at the film’s end is another example of a hidden significance that could be easily overlooked.
Chuck sees and heeds signs.
  • She heeds the signs. She recognizes Chuck as being direction-less.  Without giving him a direction, she ensures he “knows” the way. 
    • The broken ranch sign bears witness that she saw the signs of her husband’s infidelity and took action.
  • In a neat circular construction, our evidence of the husband’s infidelity occurs at the film’s beginning.
    • A Russian FedEx worker delivers an Angel-wing package to a man in a cowboy hat and bathrobe.  He, however, has a scantily-clad woman with him.  He even comments that the package is from his wife :: bad cad!
Chuck survived deprivation.
  • The Angel-wings lady has faced a similar devastation—although not as extreme or traumatic as Chuck’s.
    • The ranch sign reveals the anger of her husband’s betrayal and their divorce.  Living on the desolate prairie, she understands deprivation and priorities.  Yet she chooses beauty over bitterness.  Chuck will choose it as well.

Castaway deprives the audience of an extended Elixir ~ but do we really need it?  Our imaginations work just fine.

How to Find that Right Road Back

The task is not as difficult as it seems.

  • In The Deathly Hallows part II, Harry just has to return his soul from the white station to his body in the forest: easy peasy.
  • For 13th Warrior, the Wendol come to the Northmen who have prepared with the same courage as before.
    • We do have that lovely Invocation of Blood as they call on preceding generations of warriors, male and female, to strengthen them and to inspire them.  For a clip with the Invocation—“Lo, there do I see my people, back to the beginning”—you can flip back to the previous blog on Rewards: Click here to open that blog in a new tab.
  • With Return of the King, Aragorn releases the Dead Men of Dunharrow, rejecting arrogance and corruptible power—which Gimli doesn’t understand but Legolas views with awed approval.
  • Pride and Prejudice has Darcy force Wyckham to marry Lydia. Elizabeth has the culminating battle with Lady Catherine de Burgh.
The Road Back starts the protagonists’ journey to the Elixir, the ultimate Reward.  What is necessary to gain that Elixir?

1st Step:  Start tying up the loose ends now.  Determine the best sequence: 

  • What needs to remain until the ultimate battle? 
  • What would provide humor after that battle? 
  • For the secondary characters, what angst can they encounter before the last battle begins?  Or going into the last battle?

2nd Step: Never forget that the antagonist believes his way is the right way.  Audiences who become transfixed by antagonists might need a reminder of their particular evil—as well as that evil’s effect on the protagonists, the team of allies, and the Dear goal.

3rd Step:  Has a secondary character taken precedence and deserves the sequel?  Set up the sequel now with little hints of a driving goal.

4th Step:  The arc of the protagonists should be complete.  Has that transformation been completely shown?  Where is the protagonists’ Dear?  Safe?  Or still in jeopardy?

Castaway Breaks the Mold but still Teaches the Pattern

Castaway packs a lot into the extended scene that becomes both Road Back and Resurrection which then shifts to the culminating scene that concludes the film.  The Elixir also breaks into two parts.

Structures
  • The Road Back is Chuck’s workplace reunion at the airport followed by his reunion with Kelly at her home. 
  • The first part of the Resurrection is his rejection by Kelly.
  • In the second part of the Resurrection, Chuck talks with the friend that he didn’t realize was so loyal.  To him, he grieves for his loss of Kelly, and his friend listens and sympathizes and empathizes.
  • Chuck shares that Kelly was his goal.  He lost her, his Dear, when he washed up on that island.  He lost her all over again when she chose her fallback life rather than the difficulties required to restore a life with him. 
    • This presents both 1st and 2nd Steps, the sequence needed to cut the ties to his old life (his Road Back) and the antagonist that deprives him of the Dear he wanted (Resurrection).
  • Then we see Chuck’s transformation:  he apologizes to his friend for not being there when his friend’s wife died of cancer. 
    • This 4th Step (there is no 3rd) shows that he is no longer driven for work.  He had barely acknowledged this information at the beginning of the film.  His transformed self, however, reaches out to the miracle of friendship.

And then Chuck’s on the road, drinking water, heading to his own unexpected and miraculous end where he will have the chance to drink the Elixir of the gods.

The scene with Kelly is Chuck’s Road Back.  Yet it is also the Resurrection of Evil that deprives him of his cherished goal.

For a brief moment, we the audience want Kelly to be with Chuck.  We grieve with Chuck. 

And then Angel-wings lady helps us realize that Chuck and Kelly no longer “fit”.

Wrapping Up

When we consider the protagonists’ transforming journey and the new Dear they now treasure, the Road to bring everything Back home should pave itself.

Like the fabled yellow brick road, the Road Back becomes a curving journey to the Elixir.

Yet a horrible obstacle remains:  the Resurrection of Evil.

Join us on December 10 for an examination of the duality of the archetypal Resurrection.